North norfolk coast case study

The cliffs provide little resistance to the aggressive action of North Sea waves, which erode the base of the cliffs. This new insight and improved relations between the North norfolk coast case study sectors paves the way for finding fisheries management solutions that both protect the marine environment and the livelihood of these fishing communities.

The Institute of Traffic Accident Investigators: The full context and detail of these issues can be read in the full GIFS report here: Journal of Coastal Research, 5, North Norfolk - a regional approach to coastal erosion management and sustainability practice.

IFCAs replaced sea fisheries committees in Aprilwith an important expanded socio-economic remit to "lead, champion and manage a sustainable marine environment and inshore fisheries, by successfully securing the right balance between social, environmental and economic benefits to ensure healthy seas, sustainable fisheries and a viable industry" [3] Defra Inshore Fisheries and Conservation Authorities: Thomas Telford, Isle of Wight, It is likely that the Norfolk cliffs have been eroding at the present rate for about the last years when sea level rose to within a metre or two of its present position Clayton, The geology of the southern North Sea.

They play their part in nurturing the social fabric of their respective communities. Although now a coastal village, Happisburgh was once some distance from the sea, parted from the coast by the parish of Whimpwell, long since eroded away.

Historical change in the physical environment: Climate Change Scenarios for the United Kingdom: FLAG has worked to reinforce the powerful link between the fishers and regional identity through cultural, education and heritage projects where both local community members and tourists can learn about the history and current practices of the industry.

While there is limited fisher engagement or sense of influence at national or European level this has resulted in their growing commitment to the FLAG as a mechanism for advancing their collective voice and industry interests at national level through Defra and the MMO.

Preliminary investigation into monitoring coastal erosion using terrestrial laser scanning: The beach surface is low and scouring of the upper surface of the till extends the till platform.

Unconformably overlying these marine deposits are a series of glacial lithologies deposited during several advances of glacier ice into the region during the Middle Pleistocene c.

Coastal erosion in the eastern half of Christchurch Bay. The fishing industry today employs over one hundred and forty people in the FLAG area [1] The North Norfolk coastal economy is made vulnerable by a strong dependence on seasonal, low-wage tourism and the close inter-linkages with the future of the fishing industry on this coast both the risks and opportunities this presents is well understood within the FLAG strategy [2].

Coastal erosion at Happisburgh, Norfolk

Fine sediment sources and sinks around the East Anglian coast UK. The industry now also co-habits in this marine environment with major offshore energy developments with challenging local marine spatial planning and fisheries management implications. The cliff surface profiles show that the erosion process is non-uniform, involving the cyclic formation of a series of embayments that continually enlarge Figure 6.

Monitoring the role of landslides in 'soft cliff' coastal recession. This new insight and improved relations between the two sectors paves the way for finding fisheries management solutions that both protect the marine environment and the livelihood of these fishing communities.

The upper surface of the till undulates and comprises a series of ridges and troughs upon which the overlying Ostend Clay member outcrops. Even with the noted barriers to active participation i.

coasts case study: management- Norfolk coast

Social sustainability issues An established local level governance infrastructure through the Fishing Associations FA and their consistent support of the FLAG underpins the grass-roots good governance of this FLAG structure and secures a stronger route for fisher voice to the sub-regional scale.

Sea-level rise and climate change, including increased storminess, may also increase the rate of erosion. Rapid erosion of the cliffs at Happisburgh means that we can observe processes that for other sites may normally take thousands of years.

Case study North Norfolk

North Norfolk is a sparsely populated area of Eastern England famed for its beautiful natural coastal environment. The results from the survey provide data for models of coastal recession. Yet the FLAG has to work hard to overcome an historical apathy for collective action and the natural individualism of the fishers that has acted as a barrier to engagement in local governance.

The fishing industry today employs over one hundred and forty people in the FLAG area [1] The North Norfolk coastal economy is made vulnerable by a strong dependence on seasonal, low-wage tourism and the close inter-linkages with the future of the fishing industry on this coast both the risks and opportunities this presents is well understood within the FLAG strategy [2].

In addition to securing a higher value for catch landed through marketing and supply chain innovation. Economic sustainability issues The FLAG, as a community led collaborative model, has for the first time brought the fisheries within the local regeneration and economic development policy portfolio and as a result has focused political attention on the economic sustainability of this industry.Coastal Case Studies 1.

Happisburgh, Lyme Regis, Holderness and Mappleton, Blackpool, New Forest see your exercise books 2. The coast is scattered with isolated picturesque fishing towns and villages that rely on a tourism sector underpinned by their coastal and fishing identity (North Norfolk FLAG, ).

Coast Protection Assets The version of a detailed list of North Norfolk's coast protection assets.

Case Study for coastal recession on North Norfolk Coast

Ostend to Cart Gap Coastal Strategy Study - Provides a framework for the sustainable management of the coastal defences between Ostend and Cart Gap, including Happisburgh.

The North Norfolk coast to the west is characterised by salt marshes and dune systems and is generally an accreting stretch of coast. In contrast the east is an eroding coastline of reducing sand dunes which fronts the Norfolk Broads.

Coastal Erosion And Management On The North Norfolk 1. Coastal erosion and management on the north Norfolk coastline A2 coursework.

This is a placemat revision sheet for the North Norfolk Coast case study from Landscapes of the UK which is part of the OCR A GCSE Geography course.

Please note that this revision sheet is blank and will need to be completed by the students as part of their revision.

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North norfolk coast case study
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